9 Simple Tips for Using Faux Stone to Decorate Your House

Whether your home is a house or an apartment, a new build or a renovation, there are a few ways to achieve both cheap (and temporary) magazine-worthy design elements in your space. One of the top trending finishes right now is stone–marble backsplashes, soapstone countertops, and slate fireplaces grace design blogs and upscale magazine spreads alike. The good news is, as it turns out, architects and designers have actually been faking this stuff for a while. The truth is, real stone is costly, heavy, and difficult to manipulate. Real stone facades require labor and precision, and sometimes they just aren’t worth it. Instead, take a look at these nine simple tips to achieve the same atmosphere with half the cost and definitely half the hassle.

Contact Paper

Contact paper is one of the top ways to achieve faux stone finishes. Essentially, the contact paper is a really sophisticated sticker–good ones even imitate the glossy or matte texture of different kinds of stone. The contact paper is easy to apply and remove, and comes in all different varieties. It’s possible to hand paint these stone finishes as well, but the contact paper is less hassle and pretty cost-effective. Many of the following tips can be accomplished with either method–contact paper or paint. However, I would recommend you pay attention to your surface, because some metals require primers to paint, and the contact paper has issues adhering to highly textured surfaces.

Backsplashes

Creating a faux stone backsplash can be accomplished in a few ways. If you have a smooth surface, I would highly recommend utilizing the contact paper. However, if there is an existing (ugly) backsplash in place, you can also build a facade to fit over the old backsplash. This method is particularly effective in apartments or rentals, where you can’t simply rip out the existing backsplash. Simply find some lightweight plywood and cut it to cover the backsplash exactly, then utilize contact paper or even faux stone tiles to completely cover the plywood and fit it over the old backsplash.

Walls

Similar to replacing the backsplash, walls can easily be covered with contact paper or hand painted. Contact paper works especially well as a wallpaper, so you can easily achieve a faux marble or concrete accent wall.

Planters

Though many gravitate toward large scale faux stone finishes, it can be just as effective to use small stone accents. You can purchase faux stone planters, or even make your own with a product like quik concrete or resin and faux granite mix. Pick a container you like, line it with vaseline, pour in whatever faux stone mixture you prefer, and slide another, smaller container to create a place for your plant to sit.

Coasters

Another popular accent is stone coasters. You can purchase faux marble or granite ones at many home decor retailers, or make your own using the aforementioned methods if you have a suitable mold. You can also cover existing coasters with contact paper for a faster fix.

Faux Wall Facades

If you want to the texture of stone on an accent wall, contact paper or painting might not be the best choice. You can build a wall facade, similar to the method for covering a backsplash, one of two ways. You can purchase foam board, cut, and melt it to mimic a stone surface. You can also build a light weight facade and use faux stone to cover the surface. Accent walls like these add to the dynamism of a space, according to the BuzzFeed.

Fireplaces

The Huffington Post recommends a a faux stone fireplace to add to your space. If you don’t have a fireplace at all, you can purchase a freestanding one like the one they recommend. You can also resurface your existing fire place with faux stone tiles or hang a faux stone mantle to add a stone accent.

Vanities

This is another popular use for contact paper–cover any existing vanity top with marble or granite contact paper to give your bathroom an immediately luxurious feel. The NY Times cites this as a popular route, both for a luxe look or a more postmodernist take.

Flooring

The NY Times also notes that many plastic laminates come in faux stone finishes, and that this has recently been a popular choice of flooring for interior designers. However, it’s definitely a more outlandish choice in the realm of faux stone.

Follow Us

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *